ST. LUKE THE EVANGELIST CATHOLIC CHURCH | NEUMANN MONSON ARCHITECTS

 

AWARDS
AIA CENTRAL STATES DESIGN AWARDS / EXCELLENCE IN ARCHITECTURE_MERIT AWARD / 2017

 
 

THE PROJECT

LOCATION             
    ANKENY IOWA
SQUARE FOOTAGE
    35,000 SF
OPENED
    2015  
PHOTOGRAPHY
    CAMERON CAMPBELL, INTEGRATED STUDIO

DESIGN ARCHITECT                     
   
 NEUMANN MONSON ARCHITECTS  |  IOWA CITY IOWA
RELIGIOUS CONSULTANT / ARCHITECT
    BVH ARCHITECTS
OWNER
   
ST. LUKE THE EVANGELIST PARISH
CONTRACTOR
   
HANSEN COMPANY
CIVIL ENGINEER
    SNYDER & ASSOCIATES
LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT
    GENUS LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS
STRUCTURAL ENGINEER
    RAKER RHODES ENGINEERING
MEP ENGINEER
    MODUS
                               

 

THE STORY

This 32,000-sf church and school in Ankeny, Iowa, assembles simple pragmatic forms per typical Midwest agrarian praxis, finishes the ensemble in forthright, durable materials, and integrates sustainable systems throughout.

From the north, the classrooms’ linear array establishes an extended datum that accentuates the gym and sanctuary volumes. The sanctuary, oriented to the east, honors Catholic traditions via light, procession, form, and materiality. A gothic-arch window with exterior wood louvers anchors the wall behind the altar. Clerestory windows usher in filtered daylight. Exposed structural frames provide cadence and measure.

Locally sourced, long-lived, and low maintenance materials impart a contemporary identity rooted in the vernacular. Primary exterior finishes include Weber Stone Co. Anamosa Limestone and A606-4 Corten weathering steel, installed as a rain screen and fabricated into solar shades. On the sanctuary roof, steel covers Henry Co. self-adhered water resistive air barrier membrane, Blue Skin VP160. Precast concrete sandwich panels are integrally colored, using limestone aggregate with medium sandblast. Wood is stained cedar and poplar. Floors are sealed concrete.

Both school and sanctuary minimize energy usage and maximize beneficial solar penetration. Classrooms’ angled ceilings diffuse northern daylight deep into the space while operable windows encourage air circulation and user control. Decentralized mechanical systems transport energy with fluid instead of air, maximizing efficiency and minimizing plenum space. Continuous insulation in the building envelope minimizes thermal bridging. As the net result of these intelligent passive and active strategies, the building is projected to utilize 45% less energy than comparable church and school buildings. 

 

FULL PROJECT GALLERY

 

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