FASSLER HALL / DUST BOWL | FITZSIMMONS ARCHITECTS

 

AWARDS
AIA CENTRAL STATES DESIGN AWARDS / EXCELLENCE IN ARCHITECTURE_MERIT AWARD / 2017

 
 

THE PROJECT

LOCATION             
    OKLAHOMA CITY OKLAHOMA
SQUARE FOOTAGE
    37,046 SF
OPENED
    2013  
PHOTOGRAPHY
    JOSEPH MILLS PHOTOGRAPHY

DESIGN ARCHITECT                     
   
 FITZSIMMONS ARCHITECTS  |  OKLAHOMA CITY OKLAHOMA
OWNER
   
MIDTOWN RENAISSANCE
CONTRACTOR
   
LINGO CONSTRUCTION
CIVIL ENGINEER
   
CRAFTON TULL
STRUCTURAL ENGINEER
   
OBELISK ENGINEERING

                               

 

THE STORY

Integrating two unique entertainment concepts into one building was challenging. This was resolved by creating separate entrances with unique identities for each – the lower level accessed via 10th Street is devoted to the Dust Bowl, while the upper level accessed via Park Place is devoted to Fassler Hall. 

The front facades of the old concrete frame/masonry infill buildings were typically dressed up, so the Dust Bowl tenant's mid‐century theme is reflected there. The sides and backs of these buildings are left utilitarian. For Fassler Hall, the bones were left exposed – fitting for the beer garden. Many of these buildings have had updates over the years with a quilt‐work pattern of different colors and finish variations visible in the brickwork. A subtle nod to this was created by using areas of smooth and wire‐cut brick in patterns only visible in correct sunlight. 

Also of paramount importance was the desire to contribute to a walkable and inviting streetscape. The goal of the facade is to engage the pedestrian, accomplished by providing large expanses of storefront to allow views of the activity inside. The other was by splitting the building in half and providing access to an inviting off‐street courtyard.

nspiration for the Fassler Hall / Dust Bowl Lounge and Lanes complex came from existing building types common to the Midtown district and adjacent Automobile Alley. Simple materials such as concrete frame with masonry infill make up the bulk of the early 20th century buildings in the area, so an economical version was chosen using precast concrete columns, beams and tees, similar to the board‐formed tee structure found in the nearby Plaza Court building and other buildings in the district. 

 

FULL PROJECT GALLERY

 

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